Bags of Bran


Hobby-Racerhood
September 25, 2011, 9:51 pm
Filed under: Bike, Biography

I’m not sure if I enjoy bike racing or if I just do it because I’ve done it for most of my life. That is especially important because what I assume to be the sunset of my bike racing career is not many hours hence. It’s OK to be a hobby racer, I’ve decided, but a hobby rider? I make fun of those guys!

In all seriousness, there is a profound difference between a man consumed with Christianity and service to the expected King, and a dabbler in religious things. There does not need to be an antithesis between a hobby racer and a consumed Christian, but in my experience, usually one dog or the other gets fed.

So as far as I’m concerned, my hobby-racerhood probably has a sunset that coincides with graduation, or sooner perhaps.

This growing suspicion waxeth and waneth with success and failure. Surprised? Well, anyways, this summer has been about success and failure, and not much in between. I entered two of the Minnesota series mountain bike races and didn’t finish either of them because of physiological duress. It was too hot, I started cramping, and the light at the end of the tunnel faded from view. Out I got me, a good bit poorer and not much wiser for my efforts, and vastly humiliated.

On the other hand, I showed up on a lark at the Eau Claire WORS race, having brought my trusty old steel Gunnar single speed mountain bike (because I thought it was going to be muddy) and won the race with certitude. On an even hotter day than the other two.

Recently, it happened twice in the same week: Tuesday night I finished third in the Masters’ race at Aquilla Park (that’s really good for me), Saturday I finished 18th in the Category 3 race in Corcoran (that’s really bad for me).

I don’t know what my deal is. If I could predict it, I wouldn’t show up on the off days and waste my money. If I cared more, I would hire a coach and have him fix me.

Essentially, I’m that horse that a betting man would go broke on.

Here’s to hoping that my career as a preacher doesn’t go the same way!  It probably wouldn’t be as dramatic as Peter’s experience, where he saw thousands of eager converts after one sermon, then was run out of town after another.

For him, it probably wasn’t a matter of forgetting to eat breakfast however.

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